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Geoscience Communication An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2019-17
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2019-17
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 03 Sep 2019

Submitted as: research article | 03 Sep 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Geoscience Communication (GC).

In my remembered country: what poetry tells us about the changing perceptions of volcanoes

Arianna Soldati1 and Sam Illingworth2 Arianna Soldati and Sam Illingworth
  • 1Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Section for Mineralogy, Petrology and Geochemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Munich, Germany
  • 2Department of Natural Sciences, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK

Abstract. In this study we investigate what poetry written about volcanoes from 1800 to the present day reveals about the relationship between humanity and volcanoes, including how it evolved over that time frame. In order to address this research question, we conducted a qualitative content analysis of a selection of 34 English-language poems written about the human-volcano interactions. Firstly, we identified the overall connotation of each poem. Then, we recognized specific emerging themes and grouped them in categories. Additionally, we performed a quantitative analysis of the frequency with which each category occurs throughout the decades of the dataset. This analysis reveals that a spiritual element is often present in poetry about volcanoes, transcending both the creative and destructive power that they exert. Furthermore, the human-volcano relationship is especially centred around the sense of identity that volcanoes provide to humans, which may follow from both positive and negative events. These results highlight the suitability of poetry as a means to explore the human perception of geologic phenomena. Additionally, our findings may be relevant to the definition of culturally appropriate communication strategies with communities living nearby active volcanoes.

Arianna Soldati and Sam Illingworth
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Status: open (until 29 Oct 2019)
Status: open (until 29 Oct 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Arianna Soldati and Sam Illingworth
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Volcano Poetry A. Soldati and S. Illingworth https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/2D5K6

Arianna Soldati and Sam Illingworth
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Short summary
In this study we investigate what poetry written about volcanoes from 1800 to the present day reveals about the relationship between humanity and volcanoes, including how it evolved over that time frame. This analysis reveals that the human-volcano relationship is especially centred around the sense of identity that volcanoes provide to humans, which may follow from both positive and negative events, and has a spiritual element to it.
In this study we investigate what poetry written about volcanoes from 1800 to the present day...
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