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Geoscience Communication An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2019-10
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2019-10
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 02 Jul 2019

Submitted as: research article | 02 Jul 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Geoscience Communication (GC).

Geo-locate Project: A novel approach to resolving meteorological station location issues with the assistance of undergraduate students

Simon Noone1, Alison Brody1, Sasha Brown2, Niamh Cantwell2, Martha Coleman1, Louise Sarsfield Collins2, Caoilfhionn Darcy2, Dick Dee3, Seán Donegan1, Rowan Fealy1, Padraig Flattery1, Rhonda Mc Govern4, Caspar Menkman2, Michael Murphy2, Christopher Phillips1, Martina Roche2, and Peter Thorne1 Simon Noone et al.
  • 1Irish Climate Analysis and Research UnitS (ICARUS), Department of Geography, Maynooth University, Ireland
  • 2Department of Geography, Maynooth University, Ireland
  • 3European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF), Shinfield Rd, Reading RG2 9AX, UK
  • 4Trinity Centre for Environmental Humanities, Department of History, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

Abstract. The Global Land and Marine Observations Database aims to produce a comprehensive land based meteorological data archive and inventory. This requires the compilation of available land-based station meteorological data information from all known available in-situ meteorological data repositories/sources at multiple timescales (e.g. sub-daily, daily and monthly). During this process the service team members have identified that many of the data sources contained stations with incorrect location coordinates. These stations cannot be included in the processing to be served via the Copernicus Climate Change Service until the issues are satisfactorily resolved. Many of these stations are located in regions of the world where a sparsity of climate data currently exists, such as Southeast Asia and South America. As such, resolving these issues would provide important additional climate data, but this is a very labour-intensive task. Therefore, we have developed the Geo-locate project enrolling the help of undergraduate Geography students at Maynooth University, Ireland, to resolve some of the land-based station geolocation issues. We have successfully run two Geo-locate projects, the first in the second semester of the 2017/18 academic year and the second in the 2018/19 academic year. Both iterations to date have been very successful with 1926 out of 2168 total candidate stations ostensibly resolved, which equates to an 88 % success rate. At the same time, students gained critical skills helping to meet the expected pedagogical outcomes of the second-year curriculum, while producing a lasting scientific legacy. We asked the class of 2018/19 to reflect critically upon the outcomes and present the results herein which provide important feedback on what students felt that they gained from their participation and how we may improve the experience and learning outcomes in future. We will be continuing to run Geo-locate projects over the next few years. Due to the success of the Geo-locate project we encourage other organisations to investigate the potential for engaging university students to help resolve similar data issues while enriching the student experience and aiding the delivery of learning outcomes. This paper provides details of the project, and all supporting information such as project guidelines and templates to enable this.

Simon Noone et al.
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Simon Noone et al.
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Short summary
The Global Land and Marine Observations Database aims to produce a comprehensive land based meteorological data archive and inventory. Data sources contained stations in incorrect locations. Therefore, we developed the Geo-locate project enrolling the help of undergraduate Geography students. The project has resolved 1926 station issues so far. Due to the success of the Geo-locate project we encourage other organisations to engage university students to help resolve similar data issues.
The Global Land and Marine Observations Database aims to produce a comprehensive land based...
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